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Time to get down to business over Penlink

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Sep. 18 / 2014

In the immortal words of Flight of the Conchords – ‘‘it’s business time’’.

And you know I’m down to my socks when I tell you that it’s really time to get involved in the debate around Penlink.

The Auckland Council spent a year putting together a business case for Penlink.

I couldn’t believe it in March last year when they told me it would take until mid-2014 before the business case would be done. I suggested that by then (so far in the future as it was at the time) the information would be completely out of date.

When I told Rodney MP Mark Mitchell about that he agreed.

‘‘Ridiculous,’’ he said. Mark made a few calls, waved his magic wand, and lo and behold the business case was produced in November.

Brilliant.

Trouble is – no-one has yet seen it. Here we are almost a year later and there is no sign that Auckland Transport (AT) is ready to release the business case.

I wrote to Lester Levy and asked to speak to the AT board back in June. I’d been outraged at the lack of attention paid to our elected representatives at the previous meeting.

Accordingly, in front of the assembled board, I echoed the words of Hibiscus and Bays Local Board chairwoman Julia Parfitt, and called for the release of the business case. Levy said at that time that they were considering it, but there was a process involved.

Still waiting, we are.

Councillor John Watson called and said that there appears to be no money in any capital works budgets for Penlink any time soon. He also told me that he understood AT was now amenable to the release of the business case.

I’m interested in that because it might provide sufficient information for private investment to get involved in the funding and under the current hiatus council may be open to looking at alternative models.
Watson was suggesting the current time frame we can look forward to might be something like 2025.

Bollocks, I say.

I’m pretty confident that I reflect the views of most on the Whangaparaoa Peninsula when I say that it doesn’t matter how it’s funded, and I don’t care what the model is.

I don’t care how many lanes or what the toll scenario is, so long as the bridge gets built.
– Michael Webb-Speight is the project consultant for Fairway Bay, a Gulf Harbour residential subdivision

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